Wonderfully immersive visual history of transit in San Francisco. As the blurb on the site says:

The history of San Francisco’s transit system can be traced back as far as 1873, when the first cable car began service. Tales of technological advances, natural disasters, political struggles, and triumphant celebrations color its 140-year history and shape it into a system today that’s uniquely diverse and uniquely San Francisco.

Definitely worth losing a few hours to!

QuestionHello. First of all, great blog. Second, my question.... So, I would like to know what you know about the system Google has instituted in updating its Maps applications with Transit directions. How is it efficient? How is it inefficient? Why is it so flawed? Is it founded on a third party principle of said transit authority's prerogative to update that information, or is Google in charge of coordinating and gathering it? How should it be done? Answer

Until you sent me this, I didn’t know anything about how transit information gets onto Google Maps, nor had I really given it much thought. Some quick… uh… Googling into the matter revealed this section on Google Maps’ website, which pretty much reveals everything.

In short, it seems to be the transit agency’s sole responsibility to geotag all their stations/stops and provide a live data feed of schedule information to Google. This would seem to explain some of the inconsistencies in the way different cities display their data on Google Maps.

As to how it should be done, that’s a far more difficult question. With over 800 cities currently providing transit information this way, it seems impractical for Google to somehow edit all that data for accuracy or consistency. Better education for resource-strapped transit agencies on how to manage and export their data effectively would seem to be the only way, I would think.

builtenvironment:

image

Barcelona Metro

image

Barcelona Metro 2

image

Beijing Subway

image

Berlin S-Bahn

image

Berlin U-Bahn

image

Boston ‘The T’

image

Brussels Metro

image

Copenhagen Metro

image

Hong Kong MTR

image

Montreal Metro

image

Moscow Metro

image

New York City Subway

image

Paris Metro

image

Rotterdam Metro

image

Shanghai Metro

image

Saint Petersburg Metro

image

Stockholm Metro

image

Tokyo Metro

image

London Underground

Here’s a site which I sourced a few of the pictures. There’s some good info on it too.

Definitely related to my usual topic of discussion, and a huge part of wayfinding and corporate identity for each Metro system. Notice how instantly recognisable many of these logos are? See also this previous post regarding Metro logos from May 2012.

The Colors of Public Transit

Love, love, love this photo of wayfinding signage in Chicago. Anyone know which station this is? I’m guessing one of the Wabash stations on the Loop, but don’t know enough about them to narrow it down further.

Edit: Knowledgeable readers have identified this sign as being at Clark/Lake station - thanks!

(Source: k.james/Flickr)

Following on from yesterday’s post, here’s an amazing resource for those of you interested in trains or 1960s corporate design. The Doublearrow website showcases almost the entire British Rail Corporate Identity Manual… not just its original 1965 release, but also additions and amendments released throughout the years, all the way up to 1985. This comprehensive document covers just about every aspect of the BR identity, from the symbol and typefaces through station signage, vehicle livery and staff uniforms. Definitely worth checking out! Following on from yesterday’s post, here’s an amazing resource for those of you interested in trains or 1960s corporate design. The Doublearrow website showcases almost the entire British Rail Corporate Identity Manual… not just its original 1965 release, but also additions and amendments released throughout the years, all the way up to 1985. This comprehensive document covers just about every aspect of the BR identity, from the symbol and typefaces through station signage, vehicle livery and staff uniforms. Definitely worth checking out!

Following on from yesterday’s post, here’s an amazing resource for those of you interested in trains or 1960s corporate design. The Doublearrow website showcases almost the entire British Rail Corporate Identity Manual… not just its original 1965 release, but also additions and amendments released throughout the years, all the way up to 1985. This comprehensive document covers just about every aspect of the BR identity, from the symbol and typefaces through station signage, vehicle livery and staff uniforms. Definitely worth checking out!

Metro Logos of the World

Slightly tangential to my usual posts, but cool nonetheless. The Metrobits.org website showcases around 170 Metro logos (and other train systems as well - Sydney’s CityRail is most decidedly not a Metro, but is shown) all one page. As you might expect, there’s a lot of variations on the letter “M”!

As you probably know, Transit Maps is a blog about… well… transit maps. If photos of transit infrastructure and trains are more your thing, then I definitely recommend the Moving Life (transitblogging) Tumblr. Click on the photo or here to take a look!

(Source: northsidelou)